Lazy Searches Stop Short of theTruth

A few times in the past I wanted to know what people say about me and do the Google search. There are images of my work with other references from this blog, etc. Now I think this blog has been a part culprit of putting me out there. Here is how about 10 years ago I read about tips for making one’s blog more relevant in online searches, and thus, driving more traffic.
One-first lesson is to use hashtags well. The other point is to try to mention famous people and important ideas so that your blog about bathing your dog in the garden comes up when people are searching for reviews on the latest BMW. That kind of stuff could happen because I mentioned the neighbor’s BMW car parked beside the lawn of my house in the article when trying to give my story some scene props!
Now I shared what one strategy of getting famous through disjointed storytelling. The flip side is when your product or whatever you were advertising (that caused you to start blogging in the first place) gets wrongfully associated with others. A few minutes ago, a friend sent me a website called Ranker- www.ranker.com. The particular webpage ranked famous artists from Nigeria. They mentioned some great names- Aina Onabolu, Demas Nwoko, Yusuf Grillo, Twins Seven Seven, Chike Aniakor, Obiora Udechukwu, and Felix Idubor, etc. Hey, I jumped to the good side. Right before the list is an intro that includes Keziah Jones as a famous Nigerian artist (fine artist)! I don’t know how or where these writers get their information from. No, I know Google is everybody’s friend! A quote from the introductory lines on Famous Artists of Nigeria gets specific ‘if you are a fine art lover use this list of celebrated Nigerian artists to discover some new paintings that you will enjoy.’
Ok, it just keeps getting worse. Which moron mentions Aina Onabolu with new paintings in the 21st century? Well, we are all bloggers. When one reads the post and images of artworks of the famous artists, the writer of the post on ranker.com commit a worse offense the works of other artists get wrongly linked with the images of the famous artists. Two of my paintings are posted on that page. One is ascribed to Obiora Udechukwu and the other to Chike Aniakor. I usually mention Obiora Udechukwu who is a mentor and my professor at Nsukka in some blog posts. Also, I must have written about Chike Aniakor, who was my professor also at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Ben Enwonwu’s painted is given to Aina Onabolu while Obiora Udechukwu’s painting appears twice as Ada Udechukwu’s and Tayo Adenaike’s works concurrently. Would have been cool to make the list of famous artists, but unfortunately, only images of my work are stolen. Then the authorship is given to others. The second image is part of a poster I designed for my 2013 solo exhibition Autobiographies and Beatitudes, which held at the Pan Atlantic University. The painting is titled The Mourners from The Blessed series, culled from Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. The work was inspired by a period of mourning. I had lost my mother a few months ago and still could not live with the loss.
So Google’s search algorithms bring up images of my works when you type Obiora Udechukwu images. That’s how these things happen. Google can help show off how shallow some writers are. Or just lead you to enjoy great writing and stories behind the images. And a lazy journalist looking for cheap fame just downloads the image instead of visiting the site, adds up some stats from Wikipedia, and quickly posts. Sadly, the webpage shows the number of times people have viewed this misguided article a whopping 87.4 times, as at the time of writing this article. Maybe I should appropriate stuff for my blog and get up to a thousand views for one of my articles for a start. Maybe I should get famous for lying. The victims of such lies are everywhere. The one that got famous that way soon becomes a god with clay feet.

The image of The Mourners used in the Ranker.com article-https://nsoforanthony.wordpress.com/2017/08/17/my-dream-show-autobiography-and-beatitudes/ ;

https://nsoforanthony.wordpress.com/2012/11/29/explaining-the-exhibition-autobiography-and-beatitudes/

 

A New Phase of Art in Nigeria

2018 is the year after all things Art in Lagos and yes; contemporary Art in Nigeria will never be the same. With the demise of two important stalwarts of the Arts, the rise and rise of El Anatsui, the appearance of ‘new’ artists with training in other things to challenge the status quo; with a new patronage of Art by Ambode’s government and a fading away of yellow buses, with Sotheby’s first African Art auction happening and markedly starting an international scramble for contemporary African art, with Lagos hosting a second edition of West Africa’s biggest art fair, with the opening of the first major Contemporary Arts Museum in Cape Town; and a significant body of non-figurative artworks being sold, of installation and performance art becoming an area of interest and artists building their art spaces and usurping the position of the hitherto non-existent middlemen in their practice – with all these and more happenings comes the realization that there is an emergence of a new Nigerian Art.

Art House Foundation has a residency program that is gaining in importance and creating international connections, though one is not so sure of the auctions. Don’t get me wrong- I remain one of the most uninformed about the importance (Jess speaking) of these auctions! Apart from a few open auction calls, one wonders where or how some of these auction houses get their pieces. A way to look at it is that some of the older collectors open their storerooms and put them up to evaluate the present worth of their works.

Once iconic images like the yellow buses of Lagos are now scarce. There are fewer requests for such scenes by expatriates who want to take ‘something Nigerian’ home. The yellow buses have gone the way of the ‘Fulani milkmaids, durbar scenes, and load bearing maidens by mud huts, with the orange sun drowning into a river with coconut trees lining the riverside! To put things in context as per the New Art of Nigeria, one must remember certain facts about the present- History as a subject is no longer taught in Nigerian secondary and primary schools. This means that we have returned to the days of telling tales by moonlight, and the passing on of our traditions and history by ‘word of mouth’ (though such opportunities for conversation are also very scarce with social media activity on everyone’s mind for getting noticed, relevant or entertained.IMG_9801w.jpg

The economics of survival in a society where everything has been turned on its head has changed the view of things here. The landscapes got more and more abstract till they became blurbs of color splattered in split seconds on the artist’s canvas. Of course some of us had been early at this form of presentation of where we are as a nation, having spent most of our adolescence learning from the prophecies of King Fela Kuti. It wasn’t the marijuana that made him iconic. Not even the government of the day could rob him of his street credibility, his non-conformist, critical view of people in power. Adolescents could relate to the conflicts with their coming of age realities and phantoms. So we could paint those abstract scenes then. And like a bad dream, no one was buying it then. The connoisseurs (the buying age of pre-Independence adolescents who became adults in the glory days of the oil boom) had eyes for all histories pre-colonialism, with a few tweaks that added corrugated roofs and the bustling metropolitan chaos of an African State capital. A few of us were born in the crossroads, somewhere between the glory days and growing in the years of Nigeria losing it all to thieving leaders; to the present times where history is being erased, memories are being expunged, and new narratives to support where we are as a Nation has sprung up. For some of my generation, Art became the tool to use to speak a codified language interpreting contemporary realities. We remain the leftover bodies who did not join their smarter mates on the sojourn to new lands. We are ignorant, dull of hearing, or numb with shock at the aftermath of the disaster of contemporary Nigeria. The other day, a former classmate referred to how he now understood why some of us had publicly renounced their citizenship!Tony Nsofor, Rhapsody in Blues II

But I speak of one set of people. The other set are new to me. They have not really absorbed our history. They know what they have been told by biased relatives who think that their farmlands end at the edge of other people’s homesteads. The younger artists in Nigeria have come into it without the necessary, slower gestures of indoctrinations happening. They take what they will, and run with it. The restlessness of youth allows for hits or misses. After all, there is still time to make amends. A new non-figurative art is quite popular these days. This is understandable, judging from the foregoing. Everywhere one looks, the faces in artworks seem contorted by mixed, exaggerated feelings- anxiety, angst and sorrow, while elegant bodies now give way robust feisty bodies whose ‘aesthetic appeal’ lies mainly in being lively. Formalism is discarded for sensationalism, the wow factor is ‘it’/’in’ for now! Everyone has joined in on the ride. Nigeria blares out a new non-representational ‘ism’, all in a flush to become noticed by the institution. Now that Africa is in the limelight. Well things may be celebrated. Art is the only truth to tell the people of the gory mess we are in.

No wonder the prices of contemporary artworks in Nigeria seem to have gone up by two digits. Two privately sponsored art museums, in Lagos and in Onitsha will soon open the door to curious society who did not see Art becoming the phenomenon that inspires change, that promotes culture and transforms the mundane into a magical place in our hearts. One cannot keep up with all the exhibitions opening every weekend in Lagos. There are so many new faces and names. Is it because one is more involved in his profession, or is there an upsurge of non-academically trained artists taking over the art space? Gratefully, art is now practiced as a true profession. Artists are more interested in the end-to-end marketing and management of their work. With the growing popularity of the acrylic paint, it is now rare to meet an artist jumping out of a bus with a wet canvas, trying to sell to Mister Akar (of Signature Beyond). The Revolving Art Incubator is a new space and Nimbus was the place to see avant-garde art. 2018 is the year that completes my circle. Three years after I moved out of Lagos to establish a studio in my village, I return to a new studio in Lekki. There are new collectors who really find a resonance with my work. It is the middle age of Art for me. One is reminded again every time there is a call for artists for art competitions- one is usually 10 years overage. Maybe we have paid our dues. Maybe we paid the price to be where we are today. We open our studio doors to the rest of the world now. They should come. Things have changed so much. This year, there will be Dak’Art, many more art exhibitions and involvement with other spaces abroad. The words are fewer these days. A new critical way of discussing art has emerged. It is light-hearted, maybe like this blog post. I said it before- things have changed. Art has become fashionable, contemporary in strong terms. The child is now encouraged to become an artist. Welcome to a new phase for art in Nigeria. It cost us so much to get here. We won’t let anyone mess it up.

Photography Rule-Respect Your Subject

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Respect the subject. This is another rule for the photographer who is privileged to get up close into another person’s space with a camera. Sometimes as a photographer, I zoom in on the subject. Shooting models at Arise Fashion Show and shooting on the set of Lekki Wives, the recently released drama series produced by Blessing Egbe has been quite instructive.
I was invited to shoot the set of Lekki Wives by Emeka Nwokolo, my dear friend who also owns a shop at Ikota Shopping Complex. We met on one of those evenings I spend after closing, sitting to relax at Ritz Bar before going home, and we became good friends. I had my camera on that day, and gave Emeka a few tips about his newly purchased camera, and discussed photography in general. It was an easy choice for Emeka to get me to shoot on the set of Lekki Wives-one of the scenes was shot in the complex.

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Have you ever wondered why no one in The Palms ever looks ugly?! Lights just make flaws disappear, and the small details no longer count. Isn’t that what makes photography delightful-the interplay of light and shade just transforms the most mundane scenes into magical fantasies. So also, in real life and our ‘reading’ of people-we don’t get too close to them. We just ‘feel’ them, and are enveloped in their body language so much that the pimple on a face is not ‘remembered’, nor the scar from a vaccination.

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Using a camera with a wide aperture, or just getting an image in focus can cause all the minuscule details to show, making a beautiful face look like the surface of Mars. Lines translate to wrinkles and one sees the skin discolorations all too well, especially when one enlarges the image while editing on a computer, zooming to a hundred percentage sometimes. One thing photo editing has taught me is not to get carried away by appearances. I have also come to look beyond appearances when interacting with people. Image
Some people are repulsed by the Photoshop look. Of course it can be overdone. I personally prefer images that remind the viewer of the ambiance, of the real person being photographed. I would remove scars, discolorations and pimples that could disappear in a day or two, and stuff that could easily be corrected by creams or even cosmetic surgery. I work very subtly on the original image. It is a sign of respect. The subject let you in to his/her life, even if it’s for a second. It is that split second before the camera clicks, that magical moment when a character either puts on a mask or drops the mask.
The tedious acting on movie sets means every part will take many rehearsals, the repetition looks like drudge work. But I appreciate the beauty of the repetitive act that fine-tunes, and perfects the act, the art. It is so like the lessons of life, the performance of small repetitive acts which build up tempo, and our understanding of processes. We all play parts at all times, and our script changes with the spaces. The work of the photographer is to freeze, to immortalize the moment, following the light. He works with passion, like a griot who has been bestowed a great task of memorizing a monumental event for posterity. Photography literally takes one’s breathe away (you take a deep breath and hold it before clicking the shutter, for sharper pictures). Oh, did I tell you that i love this job?!Image